Tag Archives: survey

Back to the Future: Best Day & Time To Mail Rises from the Grave

Folks, things have gotten so bad that I’ve intentionally mashed up to movie tropes: “Back to the Future” and zombies.

Let me back up.  Email marketers–especially retailers–have done a pretty good job of jumping on the opt-down bandwagon.  If you haven’t heard the term, I refer to the practice of letting email subscribers who want to unsubscribe from you choose a more relaxed mailing frequency, such as weekly or monthly.

 

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Oh, Brooks Brothers, I wish I knew how to quit you.

While opt-down gives marketers a powerful tool for retention, it also forces us to revisit a debate that has raged since AOL accounted for the biggest number of email addresses: best day of week and time of day to mail.

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From my warm, caffeinated hands!

So I nearly tried to punch the Financial Times.

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Back off, bird.  I will cut you.

While conducting secondary research for a new project, I found a useful article on the site.  Before I could read the piece, the site served up a one-question survey: had I tried to cut down on my coffee consumption in the past year?

OK, I realize that FT probably wanted to a) recruit visitors for an awareness survey or b) simply build a profile on their visitors.  But first goddam thing in the morning, they want to ask me whether I’m thinking of giving up coffee?

[SHAKES FIST EPICALLY]

Maybe this is the flip side to “taboo data,” the idea that some data are too sensitive to use.  Maybe some are too sensitive–or obnoxious–to ask.

Behind the Numbers: 39% of us Totally <3 Big Brother!

I, for one, welcome our new wearable overlords!

Wearable

In my case, I think I could put several brands to sleep with my “lifestyle”

Accent Marketing Services recently shared a survey with eMarketer about consumers’ interest in wearables.  As the market evolves, I’m sure these will change, but one figure really stood out: nearly four out of ten respondents interested in wearables (smart watches, fitness bands, glasses, codpieces, etc.) said they wanted to give “brands more insight into [their] lifestyle.”

Come again?

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Wear the Apple Watch for your Protection, Please

The one thing that most of my friends of all political stripes can agree on is that they don’t want private companies or the government collecting more information than they need to collect.  Interestingly, the number doesn’t decline much with age (see chart above).

However, the deeper story really underlines what we generally know: people will exchange data if they get value in return.  A little additional information from the survey provides some context: nearly three quarters of respondents “think wearable tech will change how they engage with fitness providers and 22% say in-store and online shopping.”  [emphasis mine]

So, as I let my blood pressure drop to a reasonably healthy level, I think the numbers make more sense. People don’t mind (or even like) tracking when they see a direct benefit.  So:

  • Exchange data for better fitness: YES
  • Exchange data so you can buzz my wrist when I walk past a Starbucks: NO

On the other hand, The Ministry of Truth would like to have a word with the one-in-five of you who want retailers to have wearable data.

Marketing Winners and Losers at the NY International Auto Show (Part 2)

The marketing spectacle known as the New York International Auto Show had more to chew on than one man’s rant about station wagons.

For this installment, I’d like to focus on one exhibit with its hits and misses.  Ladies and gentlemen, I present Camp Jeep.

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For the past 11 years (give or take), Jeep has given consumers the opportunity to experience their vehicles’ capabilities in a first-hand manner.  They chauffeur participants over an obstacle course that shows how well the Jeeps can attack slopes, uneven ground and other things that 95% of drivers will never encounter.  All cynicism aside, the exhibit really impresses upon participants the astounding performance of the fabled brand.

Even within this impressive showcase, some aspects stand out: 2 good and one not-so-good

The upshot

  • Good: data collection from participants before and after
  • Good: keeping the troops happy
  • Not-so-good: the world’s most pointless cell phone charging station

Collecting data for fun and profit

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The Limits of Data

In my last post, I discussed an old saw of  data-driven marketing: more data are always better.  Today, I’d like to discuss another central tenet: marketers can reduce all information that matters into data.

Given a reasonably sophisticated marketing database, a marketer can record every interaction between customer and brand–every visit to the website (with permission, of course), every in-store purchase, every call to the call center.  Again, given the proper technology, the marketing database can make decisions based on those actions: send good customers first dibs on new offers, send reluctant customers offers to make them buy and so on.

Indeed, modern marketing databases generate so much data that many marketers start to see their customers as piles of data.  However, data have their limits. Continue reading