Tag Archives: privacy

Behind the Numbers: 39% of us Totally <3 Big Brother!

I, for one, welcome our new wearable overlords!

Wearable

In my case, I think I could put several brands to sleep with my “lifestyle”

Accent Marketing Services recently shared a survey with eMarketer about consumers’ interest in wearables.  As the market evolves, I’m sure these will change, but one figure really stood out: nearly four out of ten respondents interested in wearables (smart watches, fitness bands, glasses, codpieces, etc.) said they wanted to give “brands more insight into [their] lifestyle.”

Come again?

surveillance-156028_1280

Wear the Apple Watch for your Protection, Please

The one thing that most of my friends of all political stripes can agree on is that they don’t want private companies or the government collecting more information than they need to collect.  Interestingly, the number doesn’t decline much with age (see chart above).

However, the deeper story really underlines what we generally know: people will exchange data if they get value in return.  A little additional information from the survey provides some context: nearly three quarters of respondents “think wearable tech will change how they engage with fitness providers and 22% say in-store and online shopping.”  [emphasis mine]

So, as I let my blood pressure drop to a reasonably healthy level, I think the numbers make more sense. People don’t mind (or even like) tracking when they see a direct benefit.  So:

  • Exchange data for better fitness: YES
  • Exchange data so you can buzz my wrist when I walk past a Starbucks: NO

On the other hand, The Ministry of Truth would like to have a word with the one-in-five of you who want retailers to have wearable data.

Link

The invaluable PewResearch Internet Project has quantified what digital marketers have largely understood for years: consumers say they want privacy but they really like the benefits of pervasive digital information.  In one example:

  • 91% of respondents said that they “agree” or “strongly agree” that “consumers have lost control over how personal information is collected and used by companies”

    but…

  • 55% “agree” or “strongly agree” that “I am willing to share some information about myself with companies in order to use online services for free”

Consumers may have the freedom to say one thing and do another, but marketers don’t.  How should marketers respond to these findings?

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