Tag Archives: emarketer

Behind the Numbers: Market Research Isn’t a Tightrope Walk

Unlike tightrope walking, this post will dispel the suspense right away: market research differs from tightrope walking in that it’s actually a good idea to look down.

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Not brave enough to conduct market research

As I’ve said previously, I enjoy reading the eMarketer newsletter every morning because it usually has an interesting chart or two.  Usually, the headline summarizes the charts like so:

Most Mobile Banking Users Check Balances, Statements

Indeed, according to the survey, 85% check balances and/or statements.  End of story.

Except that’s not where the story ends.  Enter the tyranny of the top two box.

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Behind the Numbers: 39% of us Totally <3 Big Brother!

I, for one, welcome our new wearable overlords!

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In my case, I think I could put several brands to sleep with my “lifestyle”

Accent Marketing Services recently shared a survey with eMarketer about consumers’ interest in wearables.  As the market evolves, I’m sure these will change, but one figure really stood out: nearly four out of ten respondents interested in wearables (smart watches, fitness bands, glasses, codpieces, etc.) said they wanted to give “brands more insight into [their] lifestyle.”

Come again?

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Wear the Apple Watch for your Protection, Please

The one thing that most of my friends of all political stripes can agree on is that they don’t want private companies or the government collecting more information than they need to collect.  Interestingly, the number doesn’t decline much with age (see chart above).

However, the deeper story really underlines what we generally know: people will exchange data if they get value in return.  A little additional information from the survey provides some context: nearly three quarters of respondents “think wearable tech will change how they engage with fitness providers and 22% say in-store and online shopping.”  [emphasis mine]

So, as I let my blood pressure drop to a reasonably healthy level, I think the numbers make more sense. People don’t mind (or even like) tracking when they see a direct benefit.  So:

  • Exchange data for better fitness: YES
  • Exchange data so you can buzz my wrist when I walk past a Starbucks: NO

On the other hand, The Ministry of Truth would like to have a word with the one-in-five of you who want retailers to have wearable data.

Behind the Numbers: Welcome Content

We’re going to try something new on the blog: “Behind the Numbers.”  I want to show marketers how to interpret surveys and data by applying things they already know and–when appropriate–a healthy dose of skepticism.

The invaluable eMarketer newsletter shared a survey from content marketing firm Eccolo Media on  popular content throughout the B2B technology sales cycle.  Among other data points, Eccolo shared this one about what kinds of content these buyers want right after purchase:

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In descending order, these customers want content relating to thought leadership (36%), tech support (30%), new product info (25%) and customer stories (9%).

The data tell a good story, but they don’t tell the whole story.

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eMarketer ran a good article today on the perceived impact of Big Data.  According to Accenture, the #1 impact falls on “impacting customer relationships.”

In other words, if you’re not using data to make your customer relationships strong, there’s no time like the present.

Advertising and other Disasters

I nearly spit out my coffee when I got eMarketer’s daily newsletter this morning.  I read this newsletter every morning because, more often than not, it has at least one insightful article about marketing tactics.  (You can send me a check, @GeoffRamsey).

That said, I turned up an eyebrow at this headline: “Case Study: With Spotify Playlist, Carnival Engages a Millennial Audience.”  I have few doubts about the power of music marketing; I have many doubts about the technology-savvy Millennials’ ability to ignore Carnival’s more prominent appearances in the media. Continue reading