Data’s Inigo Montoya Problem (Part II)

If you’ve had campaigns fail because of bad data, then maybe you’ve fallen victim to the “Inigo Montoya problem of data.”  That is, maybe you’ve used data that don’t mean what you think they mean.

Previously, I discussed the origins of bad marketing data.  Now I’d like to discuss how to fix the problem.

First, I recommend something so exciting that you probably will not finish reading this post before trying it: read the dictionary.

recycle-390919_1920

Yeah, yeah.  I know.  All characters, no plot.  Wait, no.  That’s the phone book.

Continue reading

Holiday Marketing for Atheist Brands

Now that our calendars have flipped over to November, we all know what to expect from marketers.  Our inboxes will teem with tinseled evergreens.  Santa will peek out over seemingly every banner and lightbox.  Red and green will dominate Facebook’s purple.  Every marketer who racks up big sales for Holiday will open the floodgates.

Many of my esteemed colleagues have great advice for enhancing Holiday emails and other addressable media.  However, I’d like to address another group: what do you do when your brand doesn’t celebrate Christmas, Hanukah, Kwanzaa or anything else in December?  After all, not every brand relies on big Holiday sales to make a living, but they still gotta remain relevant in digital channels somehow.

Continue reading

What if We Started With Metrics?

You don’t have to like glam/prog rock to appreciate Brian Eno.  In addition to such classics as “Music for Airports” (which is exactly what it sounds like) and “Baby’s On Fire” (which I hope to God isn’t what it sounds like), Eno created a wonderful tool for getting your head unstuck: Oblique Strategies.

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 12.04.11 PM

Screengrab from http://stoney.sb.org/eno/oblique.html

Eno, also a prolific music producer, created a deck of cards with suggestions like the one above to help him out when he encountered dead ends in his work.  He instructed users to draw a card when they felt stuck and follow the directions as they wished to interpret them.  I’ve used them too many times to count to help me solve nagging client problems.

So I created my own Oblique Strategies card:

What if we started with metrics?

As in, what if we started a new marketing project not by asking about business objectives nor by asking about marketing objectives and instead by asking “what can we measure?”

Maybe it’s the 70s synthesizer music talking, but it helped me develop a framework I’d like to run by you all.

Continue reading

I don’t want to die alone. Pass the guacamole.

Superbowl 49 had more viewers than any other in history.  Turns out that football wasn’t the only thing on everyone’s mind:

184811

That’s right: 3% of you were using dating apps on your phone or tablet during the game.  By my calculations, that’s 1.6 million Americans (114 million viewers x 46% using apps x 3% using dating apps).  Roughly speaking, the population of Philadelphia was looking for love on Sunday night.  (Understandable, given that a 10-6 record didn’t merit the Eagles a playoff berth.)

If I were Match.com or even Ashley Madison, I’d really want to break those numbers out further (male vs. female, straight/gay/bi/etc., age ranges), but if nothing else, I’d at least consider running local TV spots in key markets during the game and have football or I-hate-football content or offers on the app as well.

For the record: I logged one Tweet and ten Facebook updates.  I even spoke with my wife during the game, so don’t get any ideas!

Behold, a sarcasm filter!

Sarcasm is the kryptonite of social media marketing.

After a brand reaches the friends-and-family scale, it becomes very difficult to determine whether the people chattering about your brand have serious or mocking intent.  Social listening platforms offer sentiment analysis, but…yeah.

Today, I stumbled upon Apple’s approach to the problem, as seen above.  Basically, they ask “are you serious?

I had asked Apple for a refund to my son’s iTunes card because, somehow, the App Store allowed him to download a game on his iPod Touch that it couldn’t play.  After resolving the issue (surprise: refund!), they sent a pretty standard customer satisfaction survey.  At the end of the survey, they had an open-ended text box for the respondent to put in any other comments.

Beneath this box, the survey had the question you see above: “was your comment above a compliment, suggestion or complaint?”

Granted, a CSAT survey differs greatly from a tweet.  But I wonder if a big brand couldn’t create branded hashtags to allow commenters to identify their tweets as “compliment, suggestion or complaint.”